Whipseey and the Lost Atlas - Available Now!

Whipseey and the Lost Atlas - Available Now!

Whipseey and the Lost Atlas is a colorful retro platformer that is more challenging - and vaguely menacing - than it first appears to be. The game is adorable, with its bouncy-squishy hero, plump little enemies, and cheerful music. And the design is such a clear homage to classic retro 16-bit style side scrollers like New Zealand Story, when I first plunged into Whipseey I expected an easy stroll (or “scroll”) down memory lane…

Subdivision Infinity DX - Available now!

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Pete Witcher is a Feature and Community Writer for Blowfish Studios.


In Subdivision Infinity DX you are a freelance space pilot in the cockpit of a fighter ship. You’re on a mission in the Alpha Tyche system when enemy ships appear amid the giant asteroids and industrial space litter, and a dogfight ensues. A bogey is already on your six, peppering your shields with blaster fire. You hit thrusters and bank, roll, and strafe around mining rigs and satellites, using huge floating rocks for cover while your shields recharge. You activate your boost thrusters to quickly loop around behind your enemy, maneuver your reticle onto their ship and your targeting computer locks on weapons. One volley from your blaster weapon followed by a mini-nuke-tipped homing missile, shreds the enemy ship and sends it fireballing into empty space above the giant red planet in the distance.

Explore every corner of the galaxy.

Explore every corner of the galaxy.

That’s how Subdivision Infinity DX begins, and it just gets better from there. After the initial battle and very brief tutorial, you discover your hangar/shop/mission base and meet your android companion, who exists mainly to provide exposition for the storyline. I was suspicious of the amount of dialog during the first couple missions, thinking the game would be very dialog-heavy. But there’s always a “skip dialog” option, even the first time through, and for that I thank the game designers. Sometimes I really *want* to know about backstory and character development and motives. But sometimes I just want to get to the next mission so I can fly a spaceship and destroy things using blasters and lasers and rockets.

For the first few minutes I was a bit overwhelmed by learning the controls, identifying objects around me, tracking targets, and just getting my bearings in general. There’s a lot happening on-screen at any given moment, with many different objects at many distances, most of them in motion. The first solar system in the game has a lot of red in the background, and it washed out some of the colour in the red tracking circles around my enemies, making it somewhat difficult for me to follow targets at first. Luckily most of the early-level enemies also leave long blue contrails behind them, so that made it easier. I struggled through the first couple missions more than once, but eventually completed the objectives. 

Every solar system will have it’s own colours, structures and planets, making them unique.

Every solar system will have it’s own colours, structures and planets, making them unique.

After getting familiar with the controls and completing the first few missions I thought I had this game figured out and I was expecting the usual experience that involved increasingly challenging missions with more enemies in newer, tougher ships. And Subdivision Infinity DX delivered that, which is good, but the game also surprised me and kept getting more and more interesting. When I finally got around to trying an Exploration mission, it offered new ways to interact with the environment and play the game, as well as a slightly slower pace that comfortably offset the intense battles of the Campaign missions. A few enemies warp in to harass you every few minutes, but there are lulls in between when you can scout around for items and objectives, and mine asteroids for valuable ore and minerals.

Subdivision Infinity DX does not hold your hand or “overguide” you. There’s a very brief but very immersive tutorial at the beginning of the game to show you the basics of how your ship works. Then you’re on your own. Luckily the user interface is slick and easy to navigate, and it doesn’t take long to figure everything out. Through trial and error I discovered that in Exploration missions, you can use key cards to unlock bay doors leading into semi-hollow asteroids honeycombed with tunnels and chambers. Inside you can score rare loot like blueprints for exclusive ships. (The key cards seem to be randomly dropped by enemies.) You can also launch probes in Exploration missions that reveal and target loot, which saves a lot of time exploring these massive levels. Probes can be purchased in the Store, and are sometimes dropped by defeated enemies.

The user interface is simple and easy to navigate. It allows you to jump straight into the action!

The user interface is simple and easy to navigate. It allows you to jump straight into the action!

The “inside an asteroid” quests provide a stunning contrast in scale; one moment you’re swooping through open space so deep and vast it induces thalassophobia, the next you’re slowly threading your ship through dark, narrow stone tunnels lit only by your spotlight and weapon fire. Older gamers like me might get a strong Descent vibe - and that is very OK. I found the strafing controls to be extremely useful in these tight environments, just as they are for evading fire during dogfights. 

It’s easy to earn huge sums of money by selling ore and other loot mined from certain asteroids in these Exploration missions. You can purchase a mining tool from the Shop for a paltry 100 credits, then equip it in a primary weapon slot before you embark on an Exploration mission. Once the mission begins, you can scan nearby asteroids for some that contain valuable ore and other items, then fly in close and light up your mining tool. Firing the tool’s laser into the asteroid releases loot until the giant rock breaks apart, spent. (This particular feature flashed me back to the arcade classic Sinistar; good times.) You can repeat the process until your cargo hold is full, while periodically dodging and dispatching low-level enemies that warp into the system. Make it back to the warp portal in one piece to bank your loot and sell it to the Shop back at the hangar.

Use warp portals to start and finish your missions.

Use warp portals to start and finish your missions.

The more I played, the more Subdivision Infinity DX drew me in. I got the sense that the people who designed this game cared about balance and the fun factor. The missions and tech trees progress along a basically linear path (compared to War Tech Fighters relatively high number of possible mech configurations, for example), but each unlocked weapon, ship, or mission introduces new elements that keep the gameplay fresh and exciting. There’s always a sense of progress and increasing power. New weapons can be unlocked by replaying missions to grind XP, and individual weapons can be upgraded four times each with earned money and collected drops. The light fighters I struggled to defeat with a level one Pixel Gun and Pendulum rockets are child’s play when I’m piloting my new and upgraded ship, armed with incendiary ballistic ammo, a level 5 laser, and level 5 Pendulum rockets. Fortunately, new missions bring new and tougher enemies so there are always new challenges to overcome.

Upgrade your weapons to defeat bigger and more powerful enemies.

Upgrade your weapons to defeat bigger and more powerful enemies.

There are five chapters in the game, each one taking place in a different solar system. The solar systems each have unique background colours as well as planets, stars, and local structures that add to the sense of traveling to a new place. Each chapter contains four campaign missions plus a boss fight, and two Exploration missions. The campaign missions provide a little exposition and purpose through dialog, then your ship warps into the battlefield. The objectives vary, sometimes involving tasks like searching for survivors of a space battle, but usually involve shooting enemy drones, mercenary fighter ships, cargo ships, proximity mines, mini satellites, and other explodable targets. 

Your selection of weapons is dictated by the tech tree, which is basically linear. You start with one ship, and unlock up to 9 more by reaching certain levels and acquiring blueprints and other items. Half the ships are “exclusive” and can only be acquired by finding blueprints on exploration missions. The other half can be simply purchased when unlocked. Additionally, each ship can be “evolved” once for a 20% armour boost and a 25% cargo boost. Evolving costs Evolution Kit power ups which are randomly dropped by destroyed enemies.

Upgrade your ship or acquire blueprints to unlock new ships!

Upgrade your ship or acquire blueprints to unlock new ships!

The level design is gorgeous and well-suited to a spaceship combat game.There’s no up or down, no north or south. All directions are relative to your ship and your orientation, and the explorable space goes on for days. I like how my ship behaves much more like a craft in space than an airplane in an atmosphere. When I release the thrusters, the ship continues in the direction it was traveling, and I can still rotate the ship around 180 degrees to train my weapons on the bogey previously on my six. For most ships the “boost” meter is generous, which is very convenient when you realise how immense these outer space levels are.

As a side note, I applaud Mistfly Games for deciding to use the Unreal engine to create this game. Not many spaceship combat games use the Unreal engine, but it seems to fit the genre well here. The lighting effects, explosions, smoke, and other effects are beautiful and smooth, and the physics are immersive and intuitive.

Subdivision Infinity DX’s has stunning graphics and effects.

Subdivision Infinity DX’s has stunning graphics and effects.

Subdivision Infinity DX is a solid and engaging spaceship combat game that doesn’t try to be all things to all people. The game focuses on doing a few things well and the result is a very enjoyable experience. It assumes you’ve played games like this before and want to get into the action and stay there. Subdivision Infinity DX is a smart investment for any gamer who enjoys intense dogfights set in glorious outer space backdrops against mercenaries and greeble-covered cargo transports and battleships. It’s available on Steam, PS4, Xbox, and Switch, download it today.


Subdivision Infinity DX is available now on:

War Tech Fighters - Available Now!

War Tech Fighters - Available Now!

When I reviewed War Tech Fighters for Blowfish last month I reached the conclusion that this very fun mech-battle game has a lot to offer: loads of action, a detailed universe, and hours of engaging gameplay. So I’m glad Blowfish asked me to write more about this game because there is plenty to talk about. This game is epic. It’s like stepping into a sci-fi book or movie.

Blowfish Studios at PAX East 2019 - Our Winners and our experience

Winner, winner, chicken dinner!

First of all, we want to say congratulations to our console giveaway winners!

Cassidy won the grand prize, while Arleni and William won 2nd and 3rd place.

Our giveaway winners! From left to right: Cassidy, Arleni and William.

Our giveaway winners! From left to right: Cassidy, Arleni and William.


Our PAX East experience

PAX East was amazing this year. There were a lot of interesting games, and activities to check out. If you happened to miss our booth, feel free to check out the games we featured at PAX.

Our featured games:

War Tech Fighters - War Tech Fighters puts you in control of massive, fully-customizable battle mechs making war across multiple planets. It’s fast-action battle using rapid-fire rockets and ranged energy weapons against waves of hostile fighter ships.

Projection: First Light - Designed to look and feel like vintage shadow-puppets on a backlit stage, Projection lets you control light and shadow to create platforms and ramps you can walk on and climb. As the story unfolds, you’ll travel to different countries and eras and face sinister shadow-puppet monsters.

Obey Me - Obey Me is an action 3D brawler coming soon for Steam, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Nintendo Switch. You play as soul huntress Vanessa Held or as her pet hellhound Monty beating down monsters, mutants, and “angelical machines” on Hell’s behalf.

Subdivision Infinity DX - Subdivision Infinity DX is a fast-paced space shooter that will satisfy your desire to be a hot-shot intergalactic fighter pilot. Engage in dogfights and boss battles, mine asteroids and hunt bounties, and complete main missions and side quests in this epic game packed with arcade-style action.


To everyone that stopped by booth #22120, we thank you for supporting our games. If you happen to find us at other events, don’t hesitate to stop by and meet with us. We enjoy chatting with all of our supporters. Don’t be a stranger! See you again at the next event!

Minesweeper Genius: A modern take on the classic minesweeper game!

Minesweeper Genius: A modern take on the classic minesweeper game!

Minesweeper Genius reboots the simple little game we all played ages ago and expands on it with elements reminiscent of Sudoku and maze-runner games like Bomberman. The idea is familiar – use logic to avoid deadly mines on a grid – but this time around we have a hero and a bit of a backstory.

JackQuest: The Tale of the Sword - Available now!

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Pete Witcher is a Feature and Community Writer for Blowfish Studios.


Jack Quest: Tale of the Sword is a fast-paced 2D platform adventure game that serves up plenty of everything that makes the genre fun: a simple story involving a hero with an oversized sword, his kidnapped love, and a mighty boss monster with a vast subterranean lair seething with enemies. To this classic recipe, Jack Quest adds a sassy aggro warrior spirit entrapped in that big sword, plus a long waggly red scarf, and some cool parkour-like physics to make a very entertaining game.

Jack and Nara enjoying their time together.

Jack and Nara enjoying their time together.

Jack Quest: Tale of the Sword opens with Jack sharing a quiet moment with his childhood sweetheart Nara, about to confess his love for her. Suddenly she is seized by the incredibly powerful Korg, a giant evil Orc. As Korg and Nara disappear into the earth, Jack dives after them unarmed but determined to rescue his true love. Seconds later Jack stumbles upon Kuro, a noble spirit trapped in a massive but nimble sword. The two form an impromptu alliance and Jack Quest is off and running.

One thing about Jack Quest that appeals to me is how it respects the genre, hewing to a design whose ancestry goes all the way back to, 80s arcade, and early console games like Metroid and Castlevania (Metroidvania). Jack Quest: Tale of the Sword incorporates many classic 2D-platformer themes, like picking up dropped red flasks for health, smashing wooden crates ejecting bouncing gold coins, and purchasing items from a shop (that somehow stays in business underground, surrounded by monsters). Jack’s special attack is a spinning-wheel sword move that deals rapid damage, plus the attack multiplier while protecting Jack from harm. The rewards and upgrades Jack finds and earns for defeating bosses, like double-jump boots, a map crystal, or a bow and arrow, are both satisfying and useful, enticing you to play on to the next level, and keeping gameplay fresh.

Jack using his special attack against the slime boss.

Jack using his special attack against the slime boss.

I think part of the attraction that keeps designers and gamers coming back to this classic format is the way these games constantly introduce new challenges as fast as the player wants to leap and battle through the map: new areas with different traps and tricks, new enemies and mini-bosses with new strategies, and new secrets to discover. Jack Quest definitely delivers in this department. I certainly never got bored. A little frustrated, sure, but never bored. But any frustration is outweighed by the rush of finally nailing that seemingly-impossible jump sequence or boss fight, which always seems so easy *after* you’ve conquered it. (“Why did this seem so difficult before?”) The thrill of improving your skill level to the point of overcoming these challenges is what metroidvania-type games are all about, and Jack Quest provides that thrill.

The art design in Jack Quest has that nostalgic, pseudo-16-bit look that you see in many indie titles, but the game plays and feels perfectly modern. My first reaction to the art design was something like, “Hey this game is cute, maybe it’s aimed at a younger audience.” Then I started playing, and that opinion went out the window. Jack Quest is both challenging and rewarding, and can get surprisingly intense, often demanding precision timing to make it through some tough areas. I’m sure young kids will enjoy playing Jack Quest because the basic gameplay is simple enough, but kids are definitely not the sole intended audience. There is plenty of skill required to progress very far in this game. And the more you play, the more you get the feeling the maps were designed with an eye toward speed running, making the game very replayable.

JackQuest has been carefully crafted to be both challenging and rewarding.

JackQuest has been carefully crafted to be both challenging and rewarding.

While researching the game for this article, I was surprised to learn Jack Quest was entirely designed and created by one man: José Neto, founder and sole employee of NetoX studios in João Pessoa, on the eastern tip of Brazil. He designed the art, composed some music, made all the gameplay decisions, and did all the coding for Jack Quest. I asked José about Jack Quest’s classic look and feel, and he said it comes from his lifelong fondness for video games that began when he was a youngster, playing games on many platforms during the golden age of gaming consoles in the 1980s, including the Atari 2600, Magnavox Odyssey, and most importantly, the Sony MSX. The MSX system was very successful in Brazil in the 80s, and it included a full keyboard that allowed users to create and play games by typing code directly into the system. Back then gaming magazines often published the Basic code for entire games, and José’s creativity and passion for games were strong enough to drive him to read it from the magazine and type it in line by line. Eventually, he started creating his own small games, and his skills earned him a job at a software development company, and he continues to create games on his own time.

So José Neto gets all the credit for this game being fun. Mr. Neto sneaked plenty of secrets and surprises into Jack Quest, like invisible doors and hidden rooms concealing rewards. But my favorite discovery in the game is the parkour-like wall-jump Jack can do to scale walls. Just mash the jump button while moving against a vertical wall and you can scramble right up it. There is a slight learning curve to get the timing right, but figuring it out is satisfying and encouraging. The wall-jump ability makes the gameplay and map navigation more fluid and smooth. And it creates this fun sense of freedom-of-motion as you rattle around Korg’s spacious digs.

Jack using the wall-jump to fight his enemies.

Jack using the wall-jump to fight his enemies.

Jack Quest has lots of little touches that add depth and character to the game, like the wall-jump, as well as the hit multiplier that pops up when you land repeated strikes against an enemy. There are magic torches you can seek out that let you save anywhere, anytime, instead of only at waypoint stones. And Jack Quest has this very useful “ledge peek” feature: stand close to the edge of a drop-off to move the camera down and preview what’s just below the bottom edge of the screen. Could be safe to jump down, could be patrolled by enemies, could be spikes … ledge peek lets you look before you leap.

Overall I found Jack Quest: Tale of the Sword to be an immensely satisfying 2D platformer, with loads of new challenges and surprises around every well-designed corner. It all comes together wonderfully: the art, the music, the action, the level design. The fact that the entire project was created by one dedicated game developer only makes this fun and engaging game even more impressive.

Watch the trailer!


Storm Boy: The Game - A Story About Friendship

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Pete Witcher is a Feature and Community Writer for Blowfish Studios.


Blowfish Studios is happy to share with you our new interactive storytelling game Storm Boy, based on the Australian children’s book about a boy with a special connection to nature and the animals in his world. The game Storm Boy takes you into the book to experience the beauty of South Australia’s Coorong National Park, a paradise of ocean waves, sand dunes and diverse wildlife. The environment is rendered in affectionate, artistic detail and playing the game makes you feel like you’re really visiting this idyllic place.

Explore the beach with Mr. Percival, your pelican pal.

Explore the beach with Mr. Percival, your pelican pal.

The story moves along linearly as you guide Storm Boy through the sand hills and grasses on the beach. Passages from the book appear on the screen as you trot through the sand. You can also turn around to retrace your steps and make previous passages reappear if you want to read them again.

Minigames pop up in the environment as you go, giving you the opportunity to experience more of Storm Boy’s world from his perspective, and providing another level of depth and immersion. The story describes how the tall birds near the shore stood up and clapped in the mornings, and how Storm Boy dreamed of being an ibis or a pelican. While this passage appears on the screen, Storm Boy is on the beach, watching the birds. You, the player, can step into the game here by clicking the minigame icon and becoming a soaring ibis, controlling the bird’s swooping and banking flight just over the water’s surface. As the story progresses, the environment reveals more engaging little pastimes like digging for cockles and tracing pictures in the wet sand and playing fetch with your feathered chum.

One of the many compelling mini games in Storm Boy: The Game.

One of the many compelling mini games in Storm Boy: The Game.

The heart of the story is Storm Boy’s profound friendship with Mr. Percival, a tragically orphaned pelican. The boy raises and cares for the bird, and they form a special bond as deep and meaningful as any puppy or other beloved pet could inspire. Here you get to experience the simple joys of feeding and playing with a cherished animal companion. The fact that the pet is a pelican only enhances the enjoyment.

Storm Boy and Mr. Percival.

Storm Boy and Mr. Percival.

As you might expect, a story about a solitary boy befriending a wild animal is not all fun and happiness. Storm Boy: The Game stays true to the book, and there are moments of heartbreaking poignancy. I was surprised by how intensely a few scenes impacted me and stirred up my emotions. But being a good story, Storm Boy offsets the sad bits with some thrilling heroism and heartwarming redemption, and by reminding us that lost loved ones are always with us.

The care with which the designers interpreted the book and rendered a 3D world from it really comes through. The game creates a soothing, nostalgic atmosphere evoking childhood memories with peaceful music, swaying grasses, and waves crashing on the shore. The artistry that comes through is no accident; Storm Boy’s lead game designer Ellen Jurik told me, “We liked the idea of a painterly feel, and during our research on the region, we came across some local artists who had painted the beach in that area in oils. We especially liked the art of Chris Wake.” So local artists appropriately inspired Storm Boy’s look and feel, and the way the game captures the essence of a young person’s experience in the Coorong’s distinctive environment. The art and design provide a stylized, almost dream-like hyper-vividness. It’s like the rush of seeing the ocean for the first time as a child, how it takes your breath away and is so memorable in person, but taking a photo just doesn’t capture that feeling.

As Storm Boy, explore a vibrant ocean.

As Storm Boy, explore a vibrant ocean.

With plenty of background information about the book and Coorong National Park itself, Storm Boy the game will pique your interest in this special place and probably lead you to further reading. Australians familiar with the book will find Storm Boy: The Game an ideal way to revisit a place fondly remembered, and those new to the world of Storm Boy will appreciate discovering one of Australia’s national treasures.

So once again Blowfish presents a new game that stands out from so many other games out there. Storm Boy touches your heartstrings and opens your eyes and ears to a paradise you may have never known about. It takes you in a different direction than most games these days, and it’s definitely a journey worth taking.

Find Storm Boy: The Game on: